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Course Description
  
  
Course Note
  
  
ANTH 1031
Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
YesYesNothe former ANTH 1000 or 2000
provides an overview of the field of social and cultural anthropology. Diverse case studies will be used to illustrate key anthropological concepts and methods.
ANTH / SOCI 2200
Communities
NoYesNo
is an interdisciplinary examination of the concept of Community. Readings will include community studies from North America and Europe.
ANTH 2210
Communication and Culture
NoNoNo
(same as SOCI  2210) An examination of verbal and non-verbal systems of communication, and the influence of language on human cognition.
ANTH 2230
Newfoundland Society and Culture
NoNoNo
(same as FOLK/SOCI 2230) The Sociology and Anthropology of the island of Newfoundland. The focus is on social and cultural aspects of contemporary island Newfoundland.
ANTH 2240
Canadian Society and Culture
NoNoNo
(same as SOCI 2240) A descriptive and analytic approach to the development of Canadian culture and society
ANTH / SOCI 2270
Families
NoYesNothe former Sociology/Anthropology 2270, the former Anthropology 2270
(same as the former Sociology/Anthropology 2270 and the former Anthropology 2270) is a comparative and historical perspective on the family as a social institution, the range of variation in its structure and the determinants of its development.
Anth
ANTH 2280
The City
NoNoNo
(same as SOCI 2280) Examines urban life around the world and through history.  The city as habitat and as spectacle.
ANTH 2300
Newfoundland Folklore
NoNoNo
(same as SOCI 2300) A survey of the various types of Folklore: tale, song, rhyme, riddle, proverb, belief, custom, childlore and others, with stress on their function in the Newfoundland community culture. Individual collection and analysis of materials from the students' home communities, supplemented by data form M.U.N Folklore and Language Archive.
ANTH 2410
Classics in Social and Cultural Anthropology
NoNoNo
An examination of selected milestone monographs, ground-breaking studies for subdisciplinary specialties, and major syntheses.
ANTH 2412
Threatened Peoples
NoNoNo
an examination of key social and cultural factors involved in the global extinction of small-scale societies; the intrusive influences that jeopardize small-scale societies, such as disease; economic and military incursion; the role of international non-governmental agencies in aid of threatened peoples; and the role of the anthropologist in this human crisis.
Anth
ANTH 2500
Folk Literature (same as FOLK 2500)
NoNoNo
is an examination of the major genres of folk literature: folk narrative, folk poetry and song, folk drama, and the traditional generic forms within folk speech. An introduction to the textual, comparative and contextual methods of analysis. The literature discussed will be international in scope.
Anth
FOLK 1000 or 2000, or Anthropology 1031.
ANTH 3053
Anthropology of Religion
NoNoNo
(same as RELS 3053)
Six hours of ANTH credits at the 1000 or 2000 level.
ANTH 3083
Cultural Crisis and the Environment
NoNoNo
An examination of social and cultural aspects of dilemmas in the use of renewable and non-renewable resources such as animals, arable land, forests, fisheries, air, water, fossil fuel, and nuclear energy. Special attention to Third World and marginal populations.
Six credit hours in ANTH at the 1000 or 2000 level.
ANTH / SOCI 3140
Social Movements
NoYesNothe former Sociology/Anthropology 3140, the former Anthropology 3140
(same as the former Sociology/Anthropology 3140 and the former Anthropology 3140) is an examination of social movements which challenge prevailing social institutions and cultural values. Social movements considered may Include religious cults and sects, millenarian movements, attempts at utopian and communal living, feminism, labour and revolutionary movements.
SOCI 1000 or the former 2000
ANTH 3241
Regional Studies: The Atlantic
NoNoNo
An examination of a diversity of Algonquizn-speaking Aboriginal cultures and society in the Atlantic Canada region, with specific emphasis on the Passamaquoddy (USA), Wampanoag (USA), Mi'kmaw, Maliseet and Innu.  The course draws upon anthropology but is interdisciplinary in nature, considering indigenous self-definition of each Aboriginal society.  Themes for discussion include: ethnography, identity, and political and social issues.
ANTH
ANTH 3314
Gender
NoNoNo
(same as SOCI 3314) An examination of biological, psychological, social and cultural aspects of gender, with an emphasis upon contemporary directions of change in sex roles.
Six credit hours in Soci/Anth at the 2000 level.
ANTH 3520
The Early Ethnohistory of North America's Native People
NoNoNo
(same as HIST 3520) The North American native response to early European contact and initial settlement. Particular attention will be paid to cultural change resulting from adoption of European goods, participation in the fur trade, the introduction of European disease, and the adaptation to a permanent European presence.
Six credit hours in S/A courses at the 2000 level. It is also advisable to complete Hist 1100 and Hist 1101 before attempting this course.
ANTH 3525
The Later Ethnohistory of North America's Native People
NoNoNo
(same as HIST 3525) Examines Indian and Inuit cultural history of the 18th and 19th centuries, including the fur trade, resistance and accommodation to European expansion, the emergence of revitalization movements, demographic changes, and population shifts.  Special emphasis will be placed on the ethnohistory of the native peoples of what is now Canada and northern United States.
Six credit hours in S/A courses at the 2000 level. It is also advisable to complete Hist 1100 and Hist 1101 before attempting this course.
ANTH 4071
Social and Cultural Aspects of Health and Illness
NoYesNoAnthropology 4071, the former Sociology/Anthropology 4071
(same as Anthropology 4071) will cover topics which may include: cultural concepts of illness and health; theories of disease causation; relationships between social life and illness patterns; symbotic use of illness; variations in philosophies of treatment and in practitioner/patient relationships; the social organization of medicine.
SOCI 3040 and 3150
ANTH 4072
Social and Cultural Aspects of Death
NoNoNo
(same as SOCI 4072) Covers topics which may include: symbolic meanings and values attached to death; cultural and historical variations in the management of death, e.g., treatment of the 'terminally ill', burial rites, the mourning process, and th esocial fate of survivors, together with the social and psychological meanings of these behaviours.
Six credit hours in Soci/Anth courses at the 2000 level.
FOLK 1000
Introduction to Folklore
YesYesNo
explores the role of tradition in communication, art and society. Reading assignments and audiovisual material will emphasize the use of folklore in context. Students will analyse traditions in their own lives through special assignments.
FOLK 2100
Folklore Research Methods - An Introduction
NoYesNoit is strongly recommended that majors and minors take this course before taking 3000 and 4000 level courses
introduces the resources, tools and methods that folklorists use for primary and secondary research, including interviewing and participant observation. This course qualifies as a Research/Writing course.
FOLK 2230
Newfoundland Society and Culture
NoNoNo
(same as ANTH/SOCI 2230) The Sociology and Anthropology of the island of Newfoundland. The focus is on social and cultural aspects of contemporary island Newfoundland.
FOLK 2300
 Newfoundland and Labrador Folklore
YesNoNothe former Anthropology 2300, the former FOLK 3420
(same as the former Anthropology 2300) is a survey of the full range of folklore in the province, with an emphasis on community and regional identity.
FOLK 2401
Folklife Studies
NoNoNo
An examination of the traditional cultures of Europe and North America with special reference to Newfoundland. A selection of the following areas will be covered: settlement patterns, architecture, work and leisure patterns in the folk community, calendar customs, rites of passage, folk religion, folk medicine, language and folk culture, folk costume, foodways and folk art.
FOLK 2500
Folk Literature
NoNoNo
generic forms within folk speech. An introduction to the textual, comparative and contextual methods of analysis. The literature discussed will be international in scope.
Folk
FOLK 1000 or 2000, or Anthropology 1031
FOLK 3130
Greek / Roman Mythology
NoNoNo
This courses offers a comparative study of specific myths and folktales of Greece and Rome as embodied in the literary and artistic remains of the ancient world with reference to their origins and their influence on later art and literature.  Same as CLASSICS 3130.
FOLK 3450
Language and Play
NoNoNo
An examination of such forms as the rhyme, riddle, proverb and proverbial saying, game, etc.  Emphasis on problems of function and classification.  Material will be chiefly from the British and North American traditions.  Collecting will be encouraged.
FOLK 3606
Folklore and the Supernatural
NoYesNo
focuses on the ethnography of belief systems. Students examine patterns of belief and the features of supernatural folklore.
Folk
FOLK 3830
Foodways
YesNoNo
as a term embraces a variety of traditions which focus on dietary practices as well as the preparation and allocation of food. As an introduction to foodways, the course will begin by looking at a variety of regional foods. In addition, both historical and contemporary approaches to the supply, storage, preparation and serving of food will be considered. In fact, we will be looking, from both practical and theoretical perspectives, at the whole range of cookery and food habits - from the acquisition of raw materials to the allocation of portions.
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