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 Frequently Asked Questions

Skip Navigation LinksGrenfell Campus / Counselling Services / Frequently Asked Questions
Feel free to contact either counsellor if you have further questions.

General Questions
  1. Is there any charge to see a counsellor?
  2. Is counselling confidential?
  3. Is there a waiting list?
  4. What sorts of concerns do students usually come to see the counsellors about?
  5. Do I have the choice of whether I see a male or female counsellor?
  6. Is counselling a short or long-term process?
  7. What methods of counselling do counsellors generally use?
  8. I would like to see a counsellor, but am afraid that when I get there I won’t know what to say. Should I go anyway?
  9. How do I know counselling will work for me?

Specific Concerns

  1. I’m homesick. Can counselling help?
  2. I’ve got questions about my sexual orientation. Where do I find answers?
  3. Can counselling help me get my work done on time?
  4. I’m having trouble getting along with my roommates. What can I do?
  5. I think my friend could be helped by counselling. How can I get my friend to go?
  6. A member of my family died recently and I just can’t seem to get my energy and motivation back.
  7. I have been so depressed recently that I have thought of suicide.
  8. I’m not sure my concerns are really serious enough to see a counsellor about them. Would they think I was wasting their time if I said that I just wanted someone to talk to?


Is there any charge to see a counsellor?

No. It is free of charge to students of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College.

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Is counselling confidential?

Yes. Information will not be released about you without your expressed consent. Professors, administrators, parents and others are not provided with any information regarding a student in counselling unless the student provides written authorization for release of specified information. There are, however, limits to confidentiality. These limits include suspicion of child abuse, danger of harm to yourself or others and court-ordered subpoenas.

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Is there a waiting list?

We see most clients within a day or so of their request and as soon as possible in times of crisis.

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What sorts of concerns do students usually come to see the counsellors about?

Concerns are wide ranging. Students come to discuss personal issues such as self-esteem, unhappiness, anxiety, sexuality, anger, grief and relationships with partners and families. They also discuss academic issues such as exam anxiety, procrastination and fear of failure. Students also have career concerns related to vocational interests and decision-making. In effect, the issues raised by students cover the scope of human experience.

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Do I have the choice of whether I see a male or female counsellor?

Yes. Both are available and you may see the counsellor of your choice.

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Is counselling a short or long-term process?

Counselling can be either short or long-term depending on the nature of the problem or concern. Many students may need only one or perhaps several sessions to deal with an issue. For others, the counselling process may involve sessions that continue for a semester or more.

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What methods of counselling do counsellors generally use?

Counsellors may use a variety of approaches when trying to help a student deal with a concern. For example, cognitive, behavioural and client-centred approaches may be used. The approach taken by a counsellor will depend on the student’s needs and the issue being explored.

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I would like to see a counsellor, but am afraid that when I get there I won’t know what to say. Should I go anyway?

Most definitely. Students often feel they will have nothing to say (or they won’t know what to say) to a counsellor. Most are pleasantly surprised at how easy it is to talk to a counsellor. Counsellors know how to provide a supportive, nonjudgemental atmosphere that encourages people to speak openly about their concerns.

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How do I know counselling will work for me?

We cannot guarantee that counselling will solve all your problems immediately. What does take place is that you will have the opportunity to talk about yourself and your concerns in a relaxed, confidential atmosphere with an interested counsellor. A counsellor will listen to, reflect, and clarify your concerns, while providing the empathy and encouragement you need to work out your own solutions. Not everyone benefits from counselling, but thousands of students have found it very useful in handling the academic, personal and social challenges of university life.

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I’m homesick. Can counselling help?

It is a problem that a lot of students have and talking to a counsellor about it can ease the pain.

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I’ve got questions about my sexual orientation. Where do I find answers?

The counsellors can help you discuss and explore your sexuality in a supportive and non-judgemental atmosphere.

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Can counselling help me get my work done on time?

Time management and study skills can help you get organized to prevent academic stress. Some excellent short courses are presented each semester by the Learning Centre. Just drop by the Learning Centre and sign up for one. They are free of charge.

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I’m having trouble getting along with my roommates. What can I do?

Come and talk to a counsellor before the situation gets worse. Many problems with roommates are communication problems. Counsellors can help you learn about how to resolve conflicts.

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I think my friend could be helped by counselling. How can I get my friend to go?

Having someone “volunteer” to attend counselling can be a difficult process. Some people feel quite embarrassed and ashamed when they have problems they can’t resolve themselves. Some people don’t know what counselling is all about and are worried about their privacy. The best way to allay their fears is to understand what counselling is all about yourself so that you can explain it to your friend and offer to help them make an appointment if necessary. If you are concerned about the health or safety of a friend, don’t hesitate to contact us immediately.

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A member of my family died recently and I just can’t seem to get my energy and motivation back.

Personal loss and grief can have long lasting effects. Sharing your feelings with a counsellor can help you deal with your sorrow. There is also a Bereavement Support Group that meets regularly at the Western Memorial Regional Hospital in Corner Brook. It is open to anyone who wishes the support of a group.

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I have been so depressed recently that I have thought of suicide.

You should talk to someone right away. Either contact one of the counsellors directly or tell the secretary that you urgently need to see a counsellor and you will be seen by the first available counsellor.

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I’m not sure my concerns are really serious enough to see a counsellor about them. Would they think I was wasting their time if I said that I just wanted someone to talk to?

No, come on in. A counsellor can help you clarify what is troubling you.

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* The above FAQ’s and their answers were created by Dr. Ted Baker, Director of the McGill University Counselling Service and have been adapted for our use with his generous permission.

street address:

Grenfell Campus
Memorial University

20 University Drive
Corner Brook, NL
A2H 5G4
Canada

mailing address:

Grenfell Campus
Memorial University

PO Box 2000
Corner Brook, NL
A2H 6P9
Canada

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