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Course Description
  
  
  
  
  
Course Name
Course Note
  
  
  
  
Humanities and the Contemporary World is a study of contemporary ideas found in movies,
popular music, television, comic books, graphic novels, and cultural phenomena such as
professional sporting events and fashion. The course will also focus on the mastery of
composition skills.
YesNoNo
Humanities and the Contemporary World
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 1001
  
Six Texts That Changed the World is a study of six texts which have helped shape the world
we live in. Current texts were are reading are Aeschylus' Eumenides, Plato's Republic,
Descartes' Meditations, Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, Nietzsche's Genealogy
of Morality, and Beckett's Waiting for Godot. The course is designed to develop the
skills of reading, writing, and interpreting.
NoYesNo
Six Texts That Changed the World
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 1002
  
The Ancient World is an exploration of the great ancient civilizations of the Near East,
Greece, and Rome and their role in shaping Western culture and society.
NoNoNo
The Ancient World
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 2001
  
Thought and Society in the Medieval World examines thought, art, spirituality and politics
through the writings of such figures as Dante, Chaucer, Hildegaard, and Catherine of Sienna.
This was the time of the Crusades, the Black Death, and the rise of Islam. Historical-cultural
watersheds such as these will be our focus.
YesNoNo
Thought and Society in the Medieval World
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 2002
  
Themes in Humanities (Interdisciplinary Seminar) is a seminar course in which a specific
theme - love, evil, God, war, sexuality, skepticism and others - is explored through various
disciplines, including literature, history, philosophy, physics, biology, music, and visual art. It is a team-taught course with guest lectures from professors throughout the arts and sciences
contributing under the direction of one Humanities professor.
NoNoNo
Themes in Humanities (Interdisciplinary Seminar)
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 2010
  
Special Topics encompasses a range of special topics courses offered every year.
NoNoNo
Special Topics
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 2100-2109
  
The Early Modern Period: Renaissance, Reformation, and Beyond is a study of the period
from 1450 to 1650. This is the time of the European colonization of the Americas, the
decline of feudalism, and the golden age of piracy. We will explore the roots of this world
through the work of such people as Machiavelli, Luther, Calvin, Descartes, Mme de
Lafayette, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Isaac Newton, and Galileo.
NoNoNo
The Early Modern Period: Renaissance, Reformation, and Beyond
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 3001
  
The Modern World: Reason and Romanticism examines emerging conceptions of the modern
self and society as expressed in philosophy, science, political revolution and constitution,
visual art and literature during the period 1650-1850. We will seek to understand this period
through the writing of people such as Jane Austen, John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau,
Adam Smith, Alexis de Tocqueville, Friedrich Schiller, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and
G.W.F. Hegel.
YesNoNo
The Modern World: Reason and Romanticism
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 3002
  
The Nature of Interpretation introduces students to central concepts and debates concerning
the nature of meaning and interpretation as they pertain to music, literature, the visual arts,
and various other phenomena (e.g., religious experience, pop culture). Students will gain
familiarity with contemporary and historical approaches.
NoYesNo
The Nature of Interpretation
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 3010
  
Perspectives on the Environment is an examination of modern Western, religious, feminist,
Indigenous and other ways of understanding the natural world as expressed through music,
visual art, literature, and other disciplines.
NoNoNo
Perspectives on the Environment
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 3020
  
Special Topics encompasses a range of special topics in Humanities.
NoNoNo
Special Topics
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 3100-3109
  
The Postmodern World: Authority and Rebellion is a study of the rapid change that has been
occurring from the Industrial Revolution to our modern digital world. This course explores
major developments in culture, thought, the arts, and science. We will study thinkers such as
Jacques Derrida and Roland Barthes, and novelists such as Thomas Pynchon and Don
DeLillo.
NoNoNo
The Postmodern World: Authority and Rebellion
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 4001
  
Authors, Events, and Texts examines the lives and times of such authors as Charles Dickens,
Thomas More, St. Augustine, Virginia Wolff, Mary Shelley, Doris Lessing, and the authors of
the four gospels. This course focuses on close readings of specific authors, and thus is distinct
from theme-oriented courses in Humanities
NoNoNo
Authors, Events, and Texts
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 4010
  
Special Topics encompasses a range of special topics in Humanities.
NoNoNo
Special Topics
Humanities 4020-4029
  
Independent Project (Directed Research) will have students complete an independent
research project under the supervision of one or more faculty member or members. Topics
must have the approval of the Programme Chair of Humanities.
NoNoNo
Independent Project (Directed Research)
Humanities 4950Pre-requisite: 24 credit hours in Humanities, including HUMN 3010
  
Our theme is love and, with various guest presenters, we will explore it through various disciplines
including philosophy, literature, visual art and the natural sciences.
YesNoNo
Themes in Humanities (Interdisciplinary Seminar): Love.
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 2010
  
Special Topics: Writing, Reading, Interpreting (Winter 2015) is a seminar course which
focuses on developing your abilities as a writer. Does your writing have stylistic control?
Does it have intellectual force? How well do you develop your ideas? Because of our
intense focus on your writing, the volume of required reading will be kept to a minimum. We
will engage in a close reading of one core text: Plato's Republic. This focus will allow you to
develop your own interpretative judgement through writing multiple short papers in several
drafts. Significant class time will be reserved for the discussion of your writing.
NoYesNo
Special Topics: Writing, Reading, Interpreting.
The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 2100
  
Special Topics: Contemporary Indigenous Ideas (Winter 2015) considers a range of ideas
from Indigenous academics, writers and leaders in North America and beyond. We will take
a critical approach.
YesNoNo
Special Topics: Contemporary Indigenous Ideas.
Note: The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 3100
  
This seminar will focus on the social and Political thought of G.W.F. Hegel. An important
divide in contemporary social-political thinking exists between liberals and communitarians.
Early in the 19th c., with great foresight, Hegel had already seen this 20th c. division
developing and he thought it problematic. His own thinking unites these sides. We will
reflect on his synthesis, with particular attention to his work The Elements of the Philosophy
of Right.
NoYesNo
Special Topics: Hegel's Social and Political Thought.
Note: The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 3101
  
We will focus on six women whose ideas had lasting influence: early feminist Mary Aspell,
Czarina Alexandra of Russia ("the divine right of kings"), Margaret Thatcher, Mother Teresa,
Indigenous activist and Nobel Prize winner Rigoberta Menchu. We will also introduce other
female figures of significance.
NoYesNo
Special Topics: Six Women Who Changed the World.
Note: The course is a designated writing (W) course. The course has no prerequisites.
Humanities 2101