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Course Description
  
  
  
  
  
  
Course Note
  
  
  
  
An introduction to English literature and to the use of the English language with a particular emphasis on composition.
YesNoNoIntro To English I
English 1000
  
A continuation of the studies begun in English 1000.
YesNoNoIntro to English 2
English 1001English 1000 or 1050 or the former 1100
  
An introduction to the use of English with emphasis on composition for non-native English-speaking students.
YesNoNoWriting for Second Language Students 1
Admission to English 1020 will be determined on the basis of the English Placement Test, which is required for all non-native students who do not have English as their first language
English 1020
  
This course introduces students to the major writers by detailed study of selected texts. The course will include such authors as Chaucer, Mallory, Shakespeare, Spenser, Bacon, Webster, Donne and works such as Beowulf, the Old English Elegies and Gawaine and the Green Knight. Recommended for English specialization students that English 2005 be taken first in the English 2005-2006-2007 sequence.
YesNoNoLiterary Survey I (The beginnings to 1660)
Students can receive credit for only one of English 2000, 2005, and 2110
English 2005
  
This course introduces students to the major writers by detailed study of selected texts. The course will include such authors as Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Fielding, Blake, Wordsworth, Austen, Byron, Keats and Shelley.
NoNoNoLiterary Survey II (1660-1837)
Recommended for English specialization students that English 2006 be taken second in the 2005-2006-2007 sequence
English 2006
  
This course introduces students to the major writers by detailed study of selected texts. The course will include such authors as Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Hardy, George Eliot, Dickens, Yeats, T.S. Eliot and Dylan Thomas.
NoNoNo
1) Recommended for English specialization students that English 2007 be taken third in the English 2005-2006-2007 sequence. 2) Students can receive credit for only one of English 2001, 2007, and 2111
English 2007
  
The chief emphasis will be on the development of (a) the capacity to understand and appreciate the varieties of prose through close analysis of a wide range of examples, and (b) the ability to write expository and other kinds of prose.
NoNoNoComprehension, Writing and Prose Style (I)
This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 1110
English 2010
  
A study of the outstanding works of Canadian prose from 1949 to the present.
YesNoNoLiterature (Canadian)Canadian Prose after 1949
Students can receive credit for only one of English 2146, English 2150, English 2151 and the former English 3146
English 2146Two first-year English courses
  
A study of the historical origins and development of nineteenth century American Literature, concentrating on a selection of works within their political, social and artistic contexts.
NOTE: .
NoNoNoLiterature (Modern)American Literature to 1900
Students cannot receive credit for both English 2214 and 2215
English 2215
  
Students must have completed a first-year English sequence to be eligible for English 2242
English 2242 is a survey of Science Fiction from its earliest days to the present. Subjects that will be considered include the evolution of the genre, the relations among humans, technology and multinational capitalism, and the significance of memory and space.
NoNoNoLiterature (Modern)Science Fiction
Credit may not be obtained for both English 2242 and English 2811
English 2242
  
6 credit hours in first-year English
This course begins with a survey of humour theory from antiquity to the present, and proceeds to a study of various forms and strategies of humour through a selection of works in English. Students will study texts exploring the roles that humour plays in relation to topics such as transgression, iconoclasm, class, sexuality, gender, ethnicity, culture, politics and religion.
YesNoNoIntroduction to Humour in Literature
Students cannot receive credit for both English 2243 and English 2121.
English 2243
  
6 credit hours first year English; one of Folklore 1000, Anthropology 1031, or Sociology 2000
This course examines the historical, cultural and literary impact of the Graphic Novel; investigates its continuing development; and introduces students to significant works within the genre.
YesNoNoThe Graphic Novel - Historical, Cultural and Literary Contexts (same as Social/Cultural Studies 2244)
English 2244
  
A survey of the major plays in the history of western drama from the Greeks to the end of the eighteenth century.
YesNoNoLiterature (Dramatic)Introduction to Drama I
Students cannot receive credit for both English 2002 and 2350
English 2350
  
A survey of the major plays in the history of western drama from the 19th Century to the present.
NoNoNoLiterature (Dramatic)Introduction to Drama II
Students cannot receive credit for both English 2002 and 2351
English 2351
  
A study of modern world literature in English translation, with focus on writers of the twentieth century who have attained international stature.
NoNoNoLiterature (Modern)Modern World Literature in Translation
English 2705
  
A study of writing by women in the British Isles and North America from the Middle Ages to 1900, including such items as letters and journals as well as fiction, poetry, and drama.
YesNoNoLiterature (Modern)Women's Writing to 1900
Students can receive credit for 2805 and only one of 3810 or 3830. (This credit restriction note replaces the note in earlier calendars and is retroactive to September 1, 1993.)
English 2805
  
An introduction to literature written for children and young people. Beginning with an examination of the history of children's literature in the British Isles and North America, the course will focus on twentieth century and contemporary works, touching on a broad range of genres, audiences, and reading levels.
NoNoNoLiterature (Modern)Children's Literature
English 2870
  
Will introduce students to three main areas of creative writing: poetry, prose fiction, and creative non-fiction (travel writing, autobiography, journalism). Much of the emphasis will be on writing as a medium of communication. For this reason, some of the instruction will be the workshop system in which students act as each other’s readers and audience.
YesNoNoIntroduction to Creative Writing
English 29056 credit hours in first-year English
  
A study of the development of English drama from the Middle Ages to 1580. The course may also consider the popular arts, such as folk plays and mumming.
NoNoNoLiterature (Dramatic)English Drama to 1580
English 3021
  
(Same as Classics 3110) Representative readings in English of the principal literary forms of Classical Greece. The literary achievement of the Greeks and their contributions to Western letters and culture.
NoNoNoEnglish Courses for Non-Major StudentsGreek Literature in Translation
English 3110
  
(Same as Classics 3111) Representative readings in English of the principal literary forms of Republican and Imperial Rome. The literary achievement of the Romans and their contribution to Western letters and culture.
NoNoNoEnglish Courses for Non-Major Students
English 3111
  
A study of outstanding works of Canadian fiction from the beginnings to 1949.
NoNoNoLiterature (Canadian)
English 3145
  
A study of representative Canadian poetry from the pre-confederation period to 1949.
NoNoNoLiterature (Canadian)Canadian Poetry to 1949
English 3147
  
A study of Canadian poetry from 1949 to the present, with emphasis on the work of major poets and an examination of the various styles and theories of poetry developed during the period.
NoNoNoLiterature (Canadian)Canadian Poetry After 1949
English 3148
  
A study of selected works of Canadian prose, covering both fiction and non-fiction.
YesNoNoLiterature (Canadian)Canadian Prose
English 3149
  
A study of representative Anglo-Irish drama by such authors as Wilde, Shaw, Yeats, Synge, Lady Gregory, O'Casey, Behan, Friel and Molloy.
NoNoNoLiterature (Dramatic)
This course may not be taken for credit by students who have completed English 3170 or 3180
English 3171
  
A study of major dramatic texts from 1660 to the end of the eighteenth century.
NoNoNoLiterature (Dramatic)Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century
English 3181
  
A study of at least eight plays, two from each dramatic mode: comedy, history, tragedy, and romance.
YesNoNoEnglish Core CoursesShakespeare Survey
Students can receive credit for only two of 3200, 3201, 3205 and 3206
English 3205Two second-year English courses
  
A study of the relationship between Shakespeare and his major classical sources, with a particular focus on the use of classical literature in the Renaissance.
NoNoNoEnglish Core CoursesShakespeare and the Classical Tradition
Students can receive credit for two of 3200, 3201, 3205, 3206 and 4211
English 3206Two second-year English courses
  
A study of American poetry and fiction from 1900 to 1960.
YesNoNoLiterature (Modern)20th Century American Literature
Students can receive credit for only three of English 3215, 4260, 4261, and 4270
English 3215
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